Tag Archives: ministry

Relationships aren’t Secondary

People_connected_LoopWhen we look at Scripture, we can see that Jesus continually spent time with people.  It wasn’t Plan B for him, it was his whole mission.  He had a desire to be with people and could often be found in small and large gatherings.  Somewhere in our culture, we have lost site of the fact that God works best in and through relationships.  We build programs and we create environments that are designed to ‘reach people’.  However, we have become great at trying to reach people at arms length.  We focus on the big picture without realizing that eternal differences are made one relationship at a time.  We are often so busy in this culture that it becomes very difficult to carve out time to just love on people.  And as a result, organizations are formed, but relationships are distant.  We can’t expect to make a difference in our communities if we aren’t willing to spend time with people in real life, day-to-day environments.

I want to give you four reasons to invest time in cultivating personal relationships.

1. Ministry equals Relationships.  Ministry is the ability to touch people at their needs.  It is simply to discover what is taking place in the lives of people around us and meet them there.  We can’t expect to meet the needs of people around us if we keep our distance from the people around us.  When we love people where they are, that is ministry.  When we demonstrate the love of God by valuing those who are hurt and broken, those who are searching for hope in this world, we can make an eternal difference.  This happens best when we personally invest our lives in the lives of people.  We must work side by side to make a difference for Christ.

2. Discipleship equals Relationships.  We can impart knowledge in many different environments.  However, the ability to share or gain knowledge is not discipleship.  Discipleship is living life together in a way that we not only learn the truth of the Bible, but we also learn how to apply it to our lives on a daily basis.  Proverbs 27:17 tells us that as iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another.  This simple principle teaches us that we are more likely to become who it is God has designed us to be as we spend time in Godly relationships.  He uses other people in our lives to sharpen and shape us for His glory.

3. Life equals Relationships.  Our culture is moving more and more toward a culture of isolation.  We are actually moving away from intimacy and accountability with others and replacing it with a technology substitute.  In this day and age of social media, we can feel like we are connected to people because we see what is taking place in their lives because of Facebook, Twitter and other media.  We also can freely share happenings in our day through these avenues as well.  The result is we feel as though we are connected to people without having any accountability for our actions daily.  The questions we need to ask ourselves is “Who would we turn to if we really had a need?” Is there anyone in your life right now that you can turn to with life’s toughest questions?  Is there anyone you’re close enough to (besides your spouse) that you would feel comfortable talking to about your struggles?  The truth is that God created us to live life in a culture of relationships.  Without these kinds of relationships, we are missing out on a big part of what life designed to be.  We are missing out on the opportunity to experience him in greater ways.  When we come to the end of our lives, we won’t want a bigger portfolio or to have climbed one more rung on the ladder of success, we will look back and view relationships as our biggest assets in life.

4. God loved us so much that He wanted a Relationship with us.  God demonstrated that relationships are important by desiring a relationship with us.  He became one of us, lived here on the earth in bodily form and did not sin.  He went to the cross to pay the price for all of our sins and rose from the dead to create the opportunity for us to have a personal relationship with Him.  That is powerful in itself.  God loved us in spite of who we were, in spite of what we’ve done.  He loved us not because of who we were, but because of who we could become.  He simply asks that we believe in Him.  He made the first step in coming to us in order to have a relationship with us.  Let’s follow His example and make the first step in building relationships with those around us.

Relationships aren’t secondary in our lives, they should be a primary purpose of all that we do.  The only thing in this world that is eternal is people.  So let’s intentionally invest in eternity, by spending time with people.  Let’s work hard at not seeing people for what they’ve done, but who they could become in Christ.  Extend grace when possible and enjoy the opportunity to spend time with those he died to save.  Make room in your schedule to have people in your home, in your activities, in your life.  As you do this, you’ll begin to notice a change not only in your perspective of people, but of what it is God has for you to do while you’re here on this earth.


A plan for getting there!

I recently had the opportunity to fly to a couple of different areas of the country.  On both instances, I noticed that, although, the airplane was the source of travel, there were a lot of things in place to make sure that both the passengers and the plane were able to make it to where it was supposed to go.  For the passengers, there is a solid system in place of what happens with luggage, what happens with passengers, what happens at security check-points and even what happens when boarding the plane.  For the airplane itself,  there are teams of people directing and guiding the plane to where it should be.  Additionally, the airplane is pointless without a runway for takeoff.  Someone had to think of how all of this would work in order to accomplish the overall purpose of actually riding an airplane from where you are to where you want to go.  A system is simply a plan or structure for doing something that will consistently get you from where you are to where you want to be.

In ministry, our main goal is helping people become who it is God has made them to be by reaching them where they are and helping them to get where God wants them to go.  That is our goal.  But how do we get there? Is there a process, a system, strategy, or a structure in place that will serve as the runway?  The truth is, many times we want the big goal, but fail to put a system in place to accomplish it.  I’ve noticed that having a system or structure is, in fact, a Biblical principle.  If you examine Scripture, you start to discover that God is a God of order and plans.  He has overall goals that He wants to accomplish, but He usually uses a system to accomplish it.  Explore the first chapter of Genesis, the book of Nehemiah, Jesus sending out the disciples, the plan laid out in The Great Commission, Acts 1:8, God’s redemptive plan of Salvation.  In all of these, you can see some sort of structure that was used to move toward the desired goal.

I’ve also noticed that not only is structure a Biblical principle, it is also necessary for us to be able to efficiently accomplish the overall goal.  Below are a few things that help us better understand how it is necessary:

A system is necessary to:

  • Focus our Efforts.  We need to work smarter, not harder.  In order to do this, we must have a plan to include others in the ministry.
  • Minister in our Context.  There are needs that exist around us that can’t be met if we don’t PLAN to meet them.
  • Work with a Team.  If we’re going to all work together in the same direction with the same goals, it must be structured.
  • Communicate Clearly.  We should be able to communicate our vision and our plans simply enough that even a fifth grader can understand them.
  • Stretch our Faith.  As we develop our ministries, we will dream bigger than before, reach further than before and trust God even more in the process.
  • Get us There.  We need to have a system or systems in place with an overall goal that we can see is specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time sensitive.  The system doesn’t just help us get there, but it helps us know when we accomplish the objectives of our ministry as well.
The system created must always connect back with the overall vision of the church.  This will ensure that all of the ministries of the church exist to accomplish the overall vision of the church in the community and beyond.  It must also work in unison with all other ministries of the church.  We shouldn’t create anything that competes with or conflicts with the goal of another ministry of our church.  As we develop our system for a specific ministry, it will give us a framework for allotting our time as well as our resources.  Additionally, it allows us to know if we’re moving in the right direction towards our goals or away from them.
As you develop your structure and begin to move forward, it should provide vision for change and focus for the ministry.  It should also give your team, not just a plan, but also a sense of purpose and make it easier to bring others into the ministry.  As I have been developing ministries, I have discovered that failing to provide a clear plan and structure will continue to  cause confusion and frustration for all who are involved.  I would encourage you to start  developing some simple systems that will help you get to where God wants you to go.
The reason I started this blog, www.insideministry.me, is to provide system and structure ideas for various ministries and other random thoughts as I discover new truths in ministry.  If you have any questions or would like help in moving forward with systems, I would be glad to help.  I have just recently started coaching individuals through personal, professional, and ministry related decisions and would be glad to tell you more about it if you’re interested in coaching.  You can go here to find out more.

Be Yourself

I’ve often thought about how amazing it is that God made each and every one of us unique.  I know if it were me doing the creating, once I got to a good design, I would make a lot of duplicates.  But God not only made us unique, but is glorified in our uniqueness.  But too many times, we get caught in the cycle of being someone that God did not make us to be.  We try to be like a friend, our pastor, our dad, our brother or someone else we think has it all together.  Because of this, we aren’t living in our sweet spot.  I like to think of my life like a suitcase.  When I’m getting ready to go on a trip, long or short, there are a few things that I consider as I pack my bags.  The first thing is my destination.  I pack according to where I’m going.  I’ll pack differently for going to a place near me or going overseas.  The second thing is the season or the weather.  I pack according to the time of year.  Is it going to be hot or cold?  I also consider things that I may enjoy on any trip.  Is it a business trip or a casual trip? Will I have time to read? What else can I do in my downtime?

The truth is, if we were to all pack for the same trip and then compare bags, chances are great that there wouldn’t be any two bags alike.  We take care in packing and put a lot of thought into it and a lot of it is based on who we are.  We can’t live out of other people’s bags.  It doesn’t work that way.  The clothes wouldn’t fit, the extra’s wouldn’t match what we enjoy.

God has done the same thing with us in our lives.  He considered our destination and the timing and even considered what we may enjoy.  He packed each one of us to be who he created us to be.  Because of that, each of us are packed differently.  We may have some similarities, but not one of us in here are exactly alike.  That’s God’s plan.  He doesn’t want us to all be alike … he has intentionally created us to be different.  We would find it difficult to effectively use the tools and gifts that others have been given.  But it becomes easy to use the ones that God has given to us.  Instead of running from who we are, we should be excited about how God has made us.

A key thought through all of this is that when your uniqueness meets with God’s purpose, everyone benefits!

I’ve discovered 4 reasons in scripture to be yourself.

I Corinthians 12:14-18 tells us, “Now the body is not made up of one part but of many. If the foot should say, “Because I am not a hand, I do not belong to the body,” it would not for that reason cease to be part of the body. And if the ear should say, “Because I am not an eye, I do not belong to the body,” it would not for that reason cease to be part of the body. If the whole body were an eye, where would the sense of hearing be? If the whole body were an ear, where would the sense of smell be? But in fact God has arranged the parts in the body, every one of them, just as he wanted them to be.

  1. You belong.  Belonging means that you’re connected to something bigger than yourself.  Because of that, you have a responsibility that fits with who God made you to be.  Belonging lets us know that we’re not a solo act, but part of a bigger plan.  God didn’t create us to act independently of others, but to be involved with others.  If we want to thrive and succeed as we journey through life, we must discover our place of belonging in the body.
  2. You are unique.  This is because of who you are.  God made you on purpose.  You were no accident.  You have a reason for being.  He has given you abilities, relationships, experiences and gifts that make you who you are.  Because of all of this you are uniquely gifted to do exactly what God wants you to do.  Your characteristics, background, upbringing, perspective, and skills are different than others.  This is not a bad thing, it’s a great thing for everyone.
  3. You are valuable.  Because of what you can do for the body.  You can serve God best with who he has made you to be.  Many of us are ‘fans’ of church and we love to watch what God is doing through our church.  But we cheer from the sidelines and never set foot on the field.  God didn’t create any of us to be a bench warmer.  He made you to get in the game and fulfill the role he equipped you to do.
  4. You serve a purpose.  It’s no mistake that you are where God has placed you.  God has arranged each of us in the way he wanted us to be.  You have a purpose.  Because of that purpose, you have a job to do.  This is best done as you discover who you are and work hard at being yourself.  When you realize your purpose you can serve with a purpose and a passion that only comes from God.  When you realize that you serve a purpose in His church and you step up to fill that role, you glorify God.

I Peter 4:10 tells us, “Each one should use whatever gift he has received to serve others, faithfully administering Gods grace to others.”  This should be our goal.  Our gifts are not for ourselves, but for others.  God gets the glory when you be who He made you to be.  He takes pleasure in seeing you be you.  When you don’t fulfill your role in the body of Christ, the church is crippled.  Other parts of the body have to carry the weight and are used in ways they weren’t designed to be used.

The question to ask yourself today is what are you going to do with who God made you to be?  You may feel ordinary, but God has made you to be extraordinary.  He has placed value on your life and gifted you uniquely to fulfill a roll within His body.  You serve a purpose! When you don’t we’re crippled.  When you don’t, you can’t give Him the Glory.


What’s Your Plan for the Offering?

There is one part of our worship service that is often an overlooked part of worship.  This is the time when we receive the offering.  Scripture teaches us that giving our tithes and offerings to the Lord is an act of worship.  As such, we should make this part of our service a continuation of our worship.  It’s not an add-on, an extra, or a break in the flow.  It is an act of worship.  As such, this is a time where people freely give their offering to God and as a church we receive the offering. (Often referred to as “Taking the offering”, but this creates an image for me of people with ski masks and guns taking what they want.)  We should have a well thought out plan not only of how we’ll receive the offering, but once it is received have a process in place that creates integrity in handling the gift.  Let’s explore three areas together:

1.  Preparing to Receive the Offering:  Have a plan of what you will do during this time.  Think intentionally, what are you talking about before you take the offering?  Script this out. This can include an orientation to the materials that you use or even direction to how the offering will be received and opportunities available for giving at other times (i.e. online, mailed in, foyer kiosk, etc…).  Also you can cast vision by telling them “Everything we do at the church happens because you give generously.”  Continue to cast vision for what the offering will be used for as they give.  Tell them things they made happen including testimonies, videos, baptisms, vbs, missions trips, community involvement, benevolence, outreach, etc… You can also tell them, “As part of your own personal accountability, we encourage you to use an offering envelope.”  Bottom line is we need to spend time before the offering preparing to receive it in a way that will bring honor to God.

2.  Receiving the Offering: Don’t surprise people by taking the offering at random times.  During the welcome, you can tell people about when the offering is going to be received.  This helps them get prepared for that time.  Remember that the offering is worship.  As a result, you should make it easy for people to give and be involved in this part of worship. I have heard many well meaning pastors at the time of their offering encourage first time guests not to give.  We wouldn’t encourage them not to praise God in singing or to listen to the message and respond, why would we encourage them not to give as an act of worship.  For some first time guests, the best thing they could do would be to give.  It may be what they need to do to open themselves up to God.  People aren’t offended by the fact that we receive an offering, it’s how we receive it, what we say, how we say it and present it (that’s why it is important that we think this through before we get to the offering).  As you are speaking during this time, don’t make it dark in the auditorium when you tell people to fill out their envelopes.  This works against what you’re trying to accomplish.  Give a minute warning before you take the offering so people can prepare to give.  We don’t want to rush the process of giving, but we also don’t want to get stuck here either.  You should be able to receive your offering in 45 seconds to one minute.  You can do this by placing a basket/bag  per row in your auditorium prior to services starting.  This can be placed under a chair/pew or a bag can be placed at the end of each row.  By doing this, everyone can ‘pass the plate’ at the same time and the ushers simply walk through and collect the baskets/bags.  Note: If you do not actually receive the offering during services, you lose money and your people miss out on a blessing.  If you use the tithe box, people forget to use them once they leave their seat.  Because of this, you don’t need to dismiss your service until the offering is completely received.

3.  After you have received the Offering: Take it from the floor to a secure room that is not in public traffic area.  Have a minimum of 2 counters (a few more could be helpful).  You can have all the ushers go to this room and count or just a few of them.  Once your in a secure place, I have found a good practice is to have this group pray for the offering, those who gave it and for God to use it for His glory.  Have a process in place for counting the offering.  Once that is complete, have those who counted sign of on the cashout sheet, envelope or any paperwork that is used in counting.  It is good to have a safe to keep your receipts in until it can be taken to the bank.  Once the offering is counted, place it in a bag and place the bag in the safe.  (A safe that does not require a code to place something into, but requires a code to get the money out of the safe is a good one to use.)  At no time in your process should you have only one person handling the money.  This is good to protect the church as well as those who are responsible for handling the money.  It is good to have a written plan of every step the offering takes from the moment it is collected until it is deposited into the bank.  By writing it down, you can identify areas that are needing improvement.

I believe that God honors our efforts as we build integrity into this process.  I have seen what has happened at our church as we developed a solid process of handling funds as they are given.  We have seen more first time givers and increased giving in general.  I can’t help but believe that God is pleased with our desire to be good stewards with what He entrusts with us.  If there is no system in place and things just happen from week to week, it is difficult to have integrity in place. (I know this, because of where we were before we developed our system.)  But if we’re faithful with the offerings and givers we have, I believe God will honor our faithfulness.

Resources


The value of a Ministry Rotation

One of the best ways to include more people in ministry is to create a rotation for your ministries that alternates weekly.  At present, we have a 6 week ministry rotation at our church.  This was started because as we continued to grow, we began to notice two things.  First,  the people who were involved in ministry were getting burned out from serving every week.   Second,  it was becoming harder to find valuable ministry opportunities for people to become involved in as they began to come to the church.  We started looking for solutions.  We realized our Children’s Ministry Director already had a 6 week rotation in place for her ministry that was working effectively.  It didn’t take us long to see that this was something that needed to be implemented into every ministry.  Instantly we had more opportunities to serve than we had people to fill the opportunities.  But this also gave us room to continue to grow and develop.  We also saw that people were able to serve in 2 and 3 ministries without conflict because of this style of rotation.  This helped them to be able to use a variety of gifts throughout a 6 week period.  Below are a five things I’ve noticed that having a ministry rotation has done at our church:

  1. It creates opportunity.  We don’t want to have people doing something just to fill a spot, but to feel valuable.  There are a lot of things that must be done every week both on site and off site in order to fulfill the mission of each ministry.  By rotating people in each week, we have provided opportunity for more people to become engaged in the ministry. They also become more fulfilled by serving in a way that can have a Kingdom impact.
  2. It creates ownership. It’s amazing to see that as people get plugged in through serving, their perspective changes.  It may seem like a subtle change, but it is very significant.  Often, before they get connected through ministry, they talk about “the church” they attend.  Once they have connected and have a responsibility, they talk about “their church”.  They have ownership and realize they are a part of something bigger than themselves.  They, in fact, are an active part of the body of Christ!
  3. It develops depth.  Let’s say that in order to accomplish the tasks of one ministry each week, we needed five people to serve.  By providing a six week rotation, we now move from five people in this ministry to 30 people overnight.  As we add these people into the ministry, we automatically change our thinking.  Instead of asking the question “How many do we need?”, it becomes “How many can we involve?”  We also have looked at breaking up the responsibilities of the ministry from having a large amount on one person to having it divided between multiple people.  This has helped us create even more depth within our ministries.
  4. It builds leaders.  In this structure, because we’re able to involve more people, we have a need to develop more leaders for each weekly rotation.  This is actually a good thing because as you build leaders in your church, you are creating a stronger foundation for growth.  Instead of needing one leader for a ministry team, we now see the need to have six team leaders, one for each week, who work with the ministry coordinator/leader.  Multiply this across your ministries and you quickly see more leaders rising up within your church.
  5. It builds ministries.  This is one of the best side effects to a ministry rotation we have seen.  As we have involved more and more people in ministry, it has freed our staff from some of the details of the ministry and allowed them to broaden the scope and reach of various ministries.  Because of this, we have been able to build more ministries to reach more people and provide more areas of opportunity to serve.
I think as we examine Scripture, we find that a shared ministry approach is a very Scriptural model for us to implement in our churches.  God moves and works in ways that often we don’t understand.  At times, He will move some of our key people out of our church because of another ministry opportunity, a job or another reason.  By having this ministry rotation in place, along with a way to develop leaders, we have discovered that when this does happen, we’re not left picking up the pieces and scrambling for who can help.  We already have leaders in place to help with the void.  My prayer is this post has been helpful as you develop opportunities for people to be used to impact the world around them.

I don’t measure up!

Tape measure

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I don’t know how many times I’ve let this one thought keep me from going forward.  Too often I have thought that, for a variety of reasons, God shouldn’t be able to use me.  That for some reason “I don’t measure up.”  Because of this, I’ve spent way too much time wondering about what others think of me and not enough time realizing what God thinks of me.  And to be honest, this process has kept me from being entirely who God has made me to be.

I have listed a few traps that I have fallen into that have limited my potential to be used to reach others around me…

1.  I wish I were like _______. This is a tough one.  I look at other pastors and other leaders around me and see how easily some things come to them and how sometimes it seems like ‘they have arrived’.  But as I have gotten close to some of these men, I have seen that they have struggles and areas that they want to improve on as well.  No one will ever ‘arrive’ while we are pilgrims in this world.  I’ve decided to focus more on being who God made me to be and am learning to enjoy it!  There are gifts and abilities that you and I have that are valuable to the body of Christ.  I can’t limit myself by trying to be someone else.

2.  I’m not good enough or smart enough. By being a leader, I have often thought that I also had to have all of the answers or I had to be really good at something.  When in reality, I can look around and find a lot of people who can do things better than I can or have answers to things that I don’t even know the questions to start asking.  I’ve learned that this isn’t a bad thing.  My role is that of an equipper and an enabler.  As a pastor, I don’t have to have all of the answers or be the best at doing something.  But I do have to be able to empower other people to take ownership of areas and equip them to accomplish it within their gifts.  I have learned to love handing ministries off to others.  It’s amazing to watch them grow and even watch the ministries grow past where I could have taken them.

3.  My past limits my future. Let’s just go ahead and admit this together:  we all have made mistakes and have regrets that we wish we could change.  But the truth is that God doesn’t use us in spite of our past but often because of our past.  It’s through our past that we gain a clearer understanding of who God is and what we are capable of doing.  It’s through our past that we can have empathy in the present and meet people where they are.  I’ve decided to stop living in fear of my past and let God use it to show others about His loving grace in our lives.

4.  I wonder what they think of me.  I don’t know how many times, because of an awkward conversation or situation, that I have spent time wondering what people thought about me.  As if they spend any time at all thinking about ME.  I have let this thought slow me down because I have been afraid of people’s perception.  But I have come to realize that I cannot control someone’s perception of me.  What I can control is my character, my response to a situation, my integrity, and a few other things.  But I have stopped trying to manage other people’s perception and even my reputation (which is simply other people’s viewpoint of my actions).  I can only be the best me I can be and let God handle the rest.  It’s Him that I serve and I want to give Him glory and praise in and through my life.  I’ve realized life is too short to try to control everything else.

5.  I need to be perfect.  God did not call us to perfection, but to a relationship.  He doesn’t want us to be fake, but to be genuine before Him and others.  I can’t live up to a standard of perfection, but I can live in a relationship with Him daily and seek Him at every turn.

All of these areas above could keep me from being who God has called me to be if I let them.  And the truth is I have found out that “I don’t measure up”.  But actually nobody does.  Romans 3:23 tells me that everyone has sinned and because of this we all fall short of God’s glorious standard (NLT).  So I no longer try to have all of the answers or to be perfect or to dwell on what others are thinking.  Because this isn’t the point of my life or ministry. I’m not the first one to pick up a stone when someone else falls short, because I know that it is because of the grace of God that I am who I am today. I am important and valuable not because of me but because of God in me!  It’s not about my past mistakes or my current shortcomings.  It’s about God and who He is.  Because of this, I’m learning to focus on what’s important in life and that’s people.  Let’s love them with all that we are and let them see God in us everyday.


Stewardship doesn’t just happen

 

English: One the offering plates At the back o...

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It should answer questions such as, “What happens to the offering when it is collected? Who is in charge of it? Is it ever left alone and/or under what circumstances? What is the process from the time it is received until the time it goes into the bank? Are there multiple ways to give? Are there multiple types of giving funds?  There are many other questions, but you can get the idea.  You want to think it through and involve people in every step of the process.  In setting up our ministry, I developed several different teams through which we accomplish various aspects of this ministry.  Because of this structure, I have been able to involve a larger amount of people on these teams.  The teams are described below:There was a time when I thought the stewardship ministry consisted mostly of receiving the offering on Sunday and making sure the bills were paid.  But over the past couple of years, I have been able to realize that there is much more to it than this.  In developing a Stewardship Ministry at my church I realized that one of the priorities of this ministry should be developing a system that promotes integrity.  This can only be accomplished by having a system that has checks and balances in it.  It requires having multiple people involved in the process and having a well thought out plan for every area that involves church funds.

 

Generosity Team 

 

  • Collecting, Counting & Processing: This is always done by no less than two people.  There is also a detailed cash-out process including a balance sheet.
  • Accounts Receivable: On a weekly basis this team would enter receipts of tithes, offerings, etc.  into the system and prepare deposits.
  • Weekly Contacts: First time giver follow up contacts and other necessary follow up.
  • Quarterly Donation Statements-These would be sent out in April, July, and October and in January.  They are cumulative (the January mailing would be an annual donation statement.)  This will help members be able to have quarterly overviews of their donations.

Accounting Team

 

  • Payroll:  This person would be responsible for getting payroll out on the 10th of each month.  If the 10th falls on a weekend it would be out the Thursday prior to the weekend.  Payroll period would run the first day of the month through the end of the month.  (This would give time between the end of the pay period and the time the checks actually go out.)  The person would also submit quarterly 941 statements, taxes, etc.  In addition would print and distribute the W-2’s at the end of the year.  We have outsourced this portion to a Payroll Company (Paychex).
  • Accounts Payable: This person would handle all of the monthly bills, reimbursements, process payments and make sure that they are mailed in throughout the month.
  • Reconciling: This person would reconcile all accounts.  This would be done on a monthly basis. It is good for accountability purposes to have this person be someone different than the accounts payable and accounts receivable people.
  • Credit Cards: We have moved away from church based credit cards and have developed more of an accountable reimbursement system for ministry expenses.  This has been more effective at tracking expenses.

Finance Team

 

  • Budget Accountability/Management
  • Finance Planning
  • Benevolence
  • IRS Issues

Giving Central Team

 

  • Free Financial Resources on Sundays/Web
  • Ways to Give: Including automated, online, mail-in, on-site
  • Promotional Material (Envelopes & Brochures)

Pastors’ Involvement

 

  • Giving Campaigns
  • Big Giver Follow-Up & Development
  • Stewardship Process & Vision Casting
  • Financial Small Groups, Studies, Messages
  • Development Classes (Membership, Maturity, etc…)
  • Tithe Challenge
This structure serves as a guide for how we accomplish all things stewardship.  It isn’t something that we just let happen at church.  We are intentional in casting vision, raising funds, developing disciples, and being wise and accountable with the funds God allows us to have to fulfill His vision for our church. In the upcoming weeks and months I will be defining these areas in more detail.  You can check back often and simply search for postings on Stewardship.  If you have questions before then, you can contact me @jherring17 or jherring17@gmail.com.

 

 

You may also be interested in checking out a previous blog post on an overview of Stewardship.

 


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